Balance & Hearing Tests

The path to better hearing.
Schedule a Consultation

Balance & Hearing Tests

The path to better hearing.
Schedule a Consultation

What to expect when you visit our office

Our goal is to solve your problem. We administer hearing tests and balance tests to help us to figure out what might be wrong.  Our staff has specialized training in identifying and measuring the type and degree of hearing loss and recommending treatment options.  

Detailed Case History

What we find during our testing is almost as important as the information you provide us before we even begin a balance or hearing test.

Otoscopic Examination

We exam the outer ear and the ear canal to check for anything out of the ordinary that may influence our findings.

Hearing Tests

Whether or not you have a hearing loss is important.  But it’s also important to establish a baseline for the future.

Immitance Testing

This part of a hearing test will tell us how the eardrum, the middle part of your ear including the bones in the middle part of the ear are working.

Learn more about hearing loss

We’ve found that our patients truly want to better understand as much as they can about hearing and hearing loss.  We’re glad we can be a resource for information.

1. Is there a link between hearing loss and age?
There is a strong relationship between age and reported hearing loss: 18 percent of American adults 45-64 years old, 30 percent of adults 65-74 years old, and 47 percent of adults 75 years old or older have a hearing loss.
2. Are there different styles of hearing aids?

There are three basic styles of hearing aids. The styles differ by size, their placement on or inside the ear, and the degree to which they amplify sound.

Behind the Ear Hearing Aids

Behind the ear (BTE) hearing aids consist of a small device worn behind the ear and connected to a plastic earmold that fits inside the outer ear. The electronic parts are held in the case behind the ear. Sound travels from the hearing aid through the earmold and into the ear. BTE aids are used by people of all ages for mild to profound hearing loss. A new kind of BTE aid is an open-fit hearing aid.

Small, open-fit aids fit behind the ear completely, with only a narrow tube inserted into the ear canal, enabling the canal to remain open. For this reason, open-fit hearing aids may be a good choice for people who experience a buildup of earwax, since this type of aid is less likely to be damaged by such substances.

In the Ear Hearing Aids

In the ear (ITE) hearing aids fit completely inside the outer ear and are used for mild to severe hearing loss. Some ITE aids may have certain added features installed, such as a telecoil. This makes it easier to hear conversations over the telephone.

A telecoil also helps people hear in public facilities that have installed special sound systems, called induction loop systems. Induction loop systems can be found in many churches, schools, airports, and auditoriums. ITE aids usually are not worn by young children because the casings need to be replaced often as the ear grows.

Canal Hearing Aids

Canal aids fit into the ear canal and are available in two styles. The in-the-canal (ITC) hearing aid is made to fit the size and shape of a person’s ear canal. A completely-in-canal (CIC) hearing aid is nearly hidden in the ear canal. Both types are used for mild to moderately severe hearing loss.

Because they are small, canal aids are more difficult for a person to adjust and remove. In addition, canal aids have less space available for batteries and additional devices, such as a telecoil. They usually are not recommended for young children or for people with severe to profound hearing loss because their reduced size limits their power and volume.

3. Is it possible to lose your hearing suddenly?
Approximately 4,000 new cases of sudden deafness occur each year in the United States. Hearing loss affects only 1 ear in 9 out of 10 people who experience sudden deafness. Only 10 to 15 percent of patients with sudden deafness know what caused their loss.
4. Who is the typical person suffering from tinnitus?
Of adults ages 65 and older in the United States, 12.3 percent of men and nearly 14 percent of women are affected by tinnitus. Tinnitus is identified more frequently in white individuals and the prevalence of tinnitus is almost twice as frequent in the South as in the Northeast.
5. How many adults could benefit from hearing aids?
Approximately 28.8 million adults in the United States alone could benefit from using hearing aids.

FOllow Up & Care

Our exceptional, friendly staff is one of our greatest assets, and we are proud of their long time association with our office. Patients tell us often how well we work together as a team. We pride ourselves on staying on the cutting edge of hearing healthcare and great patient communication. Each of our staff members is motivated to achieve the best results for our patients in a calming and comfortable setting.

Statistics

Noise & Hearing Loss

18% of adults aged 20-69 have speech-frequency hearing loss in both ears from among those who report 5 or more years of exposure to very loud noise at work, as compared to 5.5 percent of adults with speech-frequency hearing loss in both ears who report no occupational noise exposure.

Hearing Loss in the United States

One in eight people in the United States (13 percent, or 30 million) aged 12 years or older has hearing loss in both ears, based on standard hearing examinations.

Don't Wait Any Longer. Start Your Path to Better Hearing Today!

Location

790 E Market St, Ste 180
West Chester, Pennsylvania 19382

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Hours

M - F: Hours by appointment only
Walk-In Hours: M-F 11:30AM - 12:30PM

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